Wednesday, 20 May 2015

A ROOM OF ONE'S OWN


"I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman."
Virginia Woolf

Tuesday, 19 May 2015

REVISING VIRGINIA WOOLF




"Fiction is like a spider's web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached to life at all four corners. Often the attachment is scarcely perceptible."
Virginia Woolf


Monday, 18 May 2015

THE MODERN AGE - THE LITERARY BACKGROUND


Click here and  here to revise Modernism in literature.


Monday, 11 May 2015

WILFRED OWEN


Wilfred Edward Salter Owen was born 18 March 1893 in Oswestry, Shropshire. After school he became a teaching assistant and in 1913 went to France for two years to work as a language tutor. He began writing poetry as a teenager.
In 1915 he returned to England to enlist in the army and was commissioned into the Manchester Regiment. After spending the remainder of the year training in England, he left for the western front early in January 1917. After experiencing heavy fighting, he was diagnosed with shellshock. He was evacuated to England and arrived at Craiglockhart War Hospital near Edinburgh in June. There he met the poet Siegfried Sassoon, who already had a reputation as a poet and shared Owen's views. Sassoon agreed to look over Owen's poems, gave him encouragement and introduced him to literary figures such as Robert Graves.
Reading Sassoon's poems and discussing his work with Sassoon revolutionised Owen's style and his conception of poetry. He returned to France in August 1918 and in October was awarded the Military Cross for bravery. On 4 November 1918 he was killed while attempting to lead his men across the Sambre canal at Ors. The news of his death reached his parents on 11 November, Armistice Day.
Edited by Sassoon and published in 1920, Owen's single volume of poems contain some of the most poignant English poetry of World War One, including "Dulce et Decorum Est" and "Anthem for Doomed Youth".


Thursday, 7 May 2015

THE WAR POETS


Here you can find a PDF presentation about the War Poets.


Find out more about poetry in World War One: http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/z38rq6f

Friday, 1 May 2015

MAY


"Sweet May hath come to love us,
Flowers, trees, their blossoms don;
And through the blue heavens above us
The very clouds move on."

Heinrich Heine, Book of Songs

Thursday, 30 April 2015

A MODERN ADAPTATION OF PRIDE AND PREJUDICE



Pride & Prejudice: A Latter-Day Comedy is a  delightful, modernized retelling of Jane Austen's beloved story as the ambitious but amiable Elizabeth Bennet schemes to win over a sexually attractive bachelor who is several rungs above her in the social ladder ... 
Read here.  Now enjoy the movie ... with Spanish subtitles!


Thursday, 23 April 2015

HAPPY 451ST BIRTHDAY, WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE!


Today it is William Shakespeare's 451st  birthday! 
Here you can find some interesting videos about the Bard and  his influence on some acclaimed theatre performers.
And now let's enjoy the most perfect of all Shakespearean movies ...


Thursday, 16 April 2015

REVISING CHARLES DICKENS


Here you can find useful material to revise Charles Dickens.
Here you can find a PDF presentation about the Victorian novelist and his work.


Wednesday, 15 April 2015

GREAT EXPECTATIONS


Great Expectations is a bildungsroman which depicts the personal growth and emotional development of an orphan nicknamed Pip. It is Charles Dickens's second novel, after David Copperfield, to be fully narrated in the first person. It was first published as a serial in Charles Dickens's weekly periodical  All the Year Round, from 1 December 1860 to August 1861. In October 1861,  the novel was published in three volumes.
It is set  in the misty marshes of Kent,  and in London, in the early to mid-1800s, and contains some memorable scenes, such as the opening, in a graveyard, where the young Pip is approached by the escaped prisoner, Abel Magwitch. Great Expectations is full of intense imagery – poverty, prison ships and chains, and fights to the death – and has a variegated cast of characters who have entered popular culture. These include the spectral  Miss Havisham,  and the cold and gorgeous Estella. The themes of the novel include wealth and poverty, love and rejection, and the final triumph of good over evil. Charles Dickens felt Great Expectations was his best work, calling it "a very fine idea".
Now let's watch the 1999 BBC television film adaptation of this handsome novel. 




Thursday, 9 April 2015

WATCHING CARTOONS ONLINE


Today's suggestion? Why don't you take some time off and watch some lovely animated movies online? Enjoy!


Tuesday, 7 April 2015

ROMEO AND JULIET ON THE BROADWAY STAGE


Orlando Bloom and Condola Rashad have taken on the title characters in a modern adaptation of the timeless classic, Romeo and Juliet. Enjoy this Broadway stage production of the Bard’s most well-known tragedy!
Read here the NYT review.


Sunday, 5 April 2015