Saturday, 23 April 2016

THE 400TH ANNIVERSARY OF SHAKESPEARE'S DEATH


Read here about William Shakespeare's life, plays and language ... such an amazing article!

Some other interesting articles about Shakespeare's legacy for you to read ... 



23 April 2016: the day that marks 400 years since the death of Shakespeare 

What made Shakespeare a genius? 

“Shakespeare  – The nearest thing in incarnation to the eye of God.”  Laurence Olivier

Friday, 22 April 2016

FICTION'S GREATEST HEROINES






Charlotte Brontë in Jane Eyre created one of fiction’s most memorable heroines. 
Samantha Ellis explains why some characters endure. Read here.

Thursday, 21 April 2016

HAPPY 200TH BIRTHDAY, CHARLOTTE BRONTË!

 


QUEEN ELIZABETH’S 90TH BIRTHDAY



Queen Elizabeth’s 90th birthday celebrations will be one of the highlights of 2016, and you can  follow all the festivities here.
Click here to read lots of articles about Her Majesty's extraordinary life.


Sunday, 3 April 2016

OSCAR WILDE - 5^C LINGUISTICO



Here  you can find my previous post on Oscar Wilde. 
Click here to download a very helpful PDF presentation. 



Saturday, 2 April 2016

APRIL


"The sun was warm but the wind was chill. You know how it is with April day."
Robert Frost 

Monday, 28 March 2016

Saturday, 12 March 2016

ADJECTIVES



Click here to do lots of exercises on adjectives!



Tuesday, 1 March 2016

MARCH


"It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold:  when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade."
Charles Dickens 

Sunday, 28 February 2016

HENRY JAMES


Henry James  was  an American writer who lived in England for a long time, and dealt with English society in much of his fiction. He is regarded as one of the key figures of 19th-century literary realism. He was the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James.
He died  100 years ago, on  28 February 1916.  

Here you can read about his life and works in detail.




Saturday, 20 February 2016

HARPER LEE'S TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD


Harper Lee, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of To Kill a Mockingbird, has died at age 89 yesterday.
Born on April 28, 1926, she grew up in Monroeville, Alabama, where she was close friends with Truman Capote (whom she would later help with his work on In Cold Blood). Her father was a lawyer, like Atticus Finch, the hero of  To Kill a Mockingbird.
She published it in 1960 and won the Pulitzer Prize the following year. The 1962 film adaptation starring Gregory Peck won three Academy Awards.
The book became a beloved classic and a mainstay on assigned reading lists, but Harper Lee turned away from public life, and it seemed unlikely she would publish again. In 2007, she suffered a stroke that led to long-term health issues, which made it even more of a surprise in 2015 when her publisher, HarperCollins, announced it would publish a manuscript found in a safe deposit box that had served as an origin point for To Kill a Mockingbird; that book, Go Set a Watchman, became an instant bestseller last summer, despite controversy as to whether she had been capable of consenting to its publication.
The new book catches up with the characters two decades later; Scout Finch is a young woman living in New York City (as Harper Lee once did), home on a visit to her family. Atticus, once a champion for civil rights in the courtroom, now takes part in anti-integrationist meetings, to his daughter’s horror and disappointment. Many readers were disappointed by a depiction of Atticus as a racist, tainting the character’s image in the popular imagination as a pioneer for equality.


Here you can read TIME's original review of  To Kill a Mockingbird.
Here you can read the novel and you can find an exhaustive analysis of the plot, characters and themes here.


"Mockingbird still says what it has to say; it has managed to survive the years without preamble.” 
Harper Lee, 1993